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Keeping well at work

Your employer has an important role in improving work-life balance and it is generally recognised that work is good for health and wellbeing. But for many, ‘work’ means overcoming obstacles, excessive expectations and challenging colleagues. For others, though, the causes of stress, anxiety or depression may not be work-related, with difficulties such as bereavement, finance, relationship breakdown, family issues etc causing problems. 

Everybody responds differently to the stresses and strains of modern life. We all need and, to a degree, thrive on pressure: it gives us energy, helps with performance and inspires confidence. But excessive pressure can lead to stress. Stress may become a problem when someone feels they don’t have the resources to cope with the demands placed upon them. Harmful levels of stress can lead to mental health difficulties such as anxiety and depression.

Are you worried about yourself?

Our booklet Keeping Well at Work provides information and guidance on:

  • Managing your health at work
  • Talking to your manager
  • Returning to work after sick leave
  • Dealing with questions from colleagues

There’s lots of other help and information available - and why not download Feeling Stressed, Keeping Well, a personal workbook to help yourself take control of the stresses and worries that affect you. 

It may be helpful to develop a wellbeing plan - and here's a real example of how one person has found that to be helpful.

Somerset Public Health have also developed a Five Ways to Wellbeing App to help people improve their wellbeing  Based on the Five Ways to Wellbeing approach it will help you to take time to Connect, Take Notice, Be Active, Keep Learning and Give. This free App can be downloaded from Google Play (for Android) and the Apple App Store (for iPhone and iPad)

Watch this video on Five Ways to Wellbeing produced by our colleagues at Devon Partnership NHS Trust

Visit the NHS Moodzone for some helpful, practical information and insights or visit How Stressed Are You? for a test created by the British Association for Counselling & Psychotherapy in conjunction with Prof Cary Cooper, and hosted by the BBC.

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